A PHENOMENOLOGICAL APPROACH TO WILLIAM LYALL’S INTELLECT, THE EMOTIONS AND THE MORAL NATURE

by

GABRIEL FURMUZACHI
April 2001

Abstract

In their work The Faces of Reason: An Essay on Philosophy and Culture in English Canada 1850-1950, Leslie Armour and Elizabeth Trott consider that the Canadian way of doing philosophy uses reason in an accommodationist manner.

I propose in this work that William Lyall’s Intellect, the Emotions and the Moral Nature represents a splendid example of the accommodationist use of reason.

The Maritimes philosopher advances the idea that emotions have a cognitive value, a claim which I support by trying to put Lyall’s ideas in a modern framework offered by French philosopher Jean Paul Sartre.

Latent in Lyall’s work can also be found a theory of metaphor which I try to revive with the help of French philosopher Paul Ricoeur.

Thus, following Lyall, emotions and reason are always in a balance and they work together in order to give us a more consistent and fuller grasp of reality.


TABLE OF CONTENTS


I. WILLIAM LYALL

AN OVERVIEW OF WILLIAM LYALL’S PHILOSOPHY

       Philosophy in Canada

       Lyall the Philosopher, Lyall the Romantic

       Lyall’s Method

       Lyall’s Understanding of the Intellect

       Emotions, Morality and Being

INTELLECT, EMOTIONS AND IMAGINATION

II. ON EMOTION

FOUR THEORIES OF EMOTION

       The Feeling Theory

       The Behaviorist Theory

       The Psychoanalytic Theory

       The Cognitive Theory

FROM LYALL TO SARTRE AND BACK

       Sartre: Imagination and Emotions

       The Magical World

       Lyall and Sartre


III. ON METAPHOR

FOUR THEORIES OF METAPHOR

       The Emotive Theory

       The Comparison Theory

       The Iconic Signification Theory

       The Verbal Opposition Theory

TURBAYNE, WHEELWRIGHT AND METAPHORICAL REALITY

       Turbayne and The Myth of Metaphor

       Philip Wheelwright’s Metaphor and Reality

       Epiphor

       Diaphor

ENTER RICOEUR!

       Reference: Metaphors and Reality

       Imagination

LYALL AND METAPHORS

      The Emotive Dimension


IV. CONCLUDING REMARKS


APPENDIX

REFERENCES